highline

EVENT: Time Travel

  Image © WeCameInPeace

  Image © WeCameInPeace

We were invited to share some of our work this week at 19 Kenmare. This Wednesday November 2, 2011 from 6 till 9 at Dell's pop up experience, CREATE, WORK INSPIRE. Presentation will start at 6:30. We’ll start by sharing our short piece entitled “One Minute High Line”. A screening and discussion of our process creating a time-lapse film of the High Line, for the architecture firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro. The film is currently being shown as part of an exhibition featuring Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s work at the Gwangju Design Biennale in South Korea.  

  Image © WeCameInPeace

  Image © WeCameInPeace

NEW WORK : Highline Film for DS+R

A simulation of the Film installed at the Korean Museum.

We were commissioned by Diller Scofidio Renfro to help them create a film that would take the view from the southern most point on the highline to the highest point, in three minutes. We experimented with many techniques and arrived at a mobile timelapse/stop-motion technique with very long exposures. The first use of this film will be in an exhibition that launches today in Fourth Gwangju Design Biennale ( September 2 - October 23, 2011) in South Korea that has been curated by Ai WeiWei.

See the finished Highline Stop-Motion Film for Diller Scofidio Renfro
 

A view of the crowds outside the   GWANGJU BIENNALE

A view of the crowds outside the GWANGJU BIENNALE

PRESS: "Walking on Air", NYTIMES

The highline film is still a work in progress and is due in a week or so, but thought we would share this article called "Walking on Air"  that we are in about the HIGHLINE, that was written by Jeff Gordinier.

Their solution was clever, albeit rudimentary: they mounted a digital camera to a wheelchair. “It looked like the robot from ‘Short Circuit,’ ” Ms. Sloan said. They pushed their rolling eye along the High Line very patiently, clicking a slow, long-exposure shutter to capture the blur of people in motion.


“The entire journey from one end to the other took us eight hours,” Mr. Jaeger said.


— NYTIMES